Reggae – A Film

I read Benjamin Zephaniah’s piece in the Guardian today about Snoop Dogg’s conversion to Rastafarianism, then I spotted the following.  Timely I’d say. British film maker and writer Horace Ove’s Reggae was the first documentary to capture the early days of reggae’s UK invasion and its growing popularity outside of Jamaica. In this mix of performances filmed at Wembley Stadium in 1970 combined with footage shot in the West Indies and interviews and commentaries providing social and political context, we are introduced to reggae as an art form that transcends music and becomes an articulation of a complex culture and a powerful medium for change.

Spotted at the ever-dependable Dangerous Minds

Capitalism Is Making Humanity Obsolete

Eric Hobsbawm, the prominent British Marxist historian was recently on BBC Newsnight, discussing the “pathological degeneration” of the Capitalist system. The eminent, 94-year-old best-selling author recently published a new book How To Change The World: Reflections on Marx and Marxism.  Check him.

Spotted at Dangerous Minds, where they added the following comment, “It’s difficult to imagine a conversation like this appearing on American television, but that is what YouTube is for, isn’t it?”

Television, the drug of the nation.

 

William Burroughs Documentary

Dangerous Minds have been on fire lately, pulling all manner of musical, political, social, weird shit out of the wired world.  They recently provided a link to the BBC program Arena and their documentary of the William of Burroughs.  Top business.  Tons of my favourite audio  come from him, that gravely voice from beyond addressing the governments and syndicates of the world “Pay it all back.”, yes, as used by the On-U Sound stable: Keith le Blanc, Mark Stewart, Tackhead, Adrian Sherwood,… and who knows who else.

THE LAST WORDS OF HASSAN SABBAH

”Don’t let them see us, don’t tell them what we are doing!
Premature, premature, reconversion, reconversion blues.”

Shall I show them the blues?

“No! No! No!
Premature! Premature! Premature!”

Are these the words of the all powerful boards and syndicates of the Earth?
I say to all: these words are not premature, these words may be too late.

Minutes to go. Minutes to go. Minutes to goo. Minutes to green goo.
What I have to say is everywhere now
Rub out the word Jew and you rub out the word Hitler
The answer comes before the question
My words are for all – for all,
I repeat for all!
No one is excluded!
Free to all who pay, free to all who paying pay, for all to see,
for all to see!
In Piccadilly, in Times Square, Place de la Concorde,
In all the streets and plazas of the world!

Pay, pay, pay!
Play it all, play it all, play it all back!
Pay it all, pay it all, pay it all back!

The documentary is viewable here

The Sonic Experience – Paul Morley interviews Jah Wobble

“Dub is music from another constellation.  When playing it’s like being in contact with a star many many years away, and that is where you come from.”

UK journalist Paul Morley looks at dubstep, what is is, where it’s going (who knows), and speaks with Ikonika, Darkstar, Magnetic Man the group made up of pioneers Skream, Benga and Artwork.  Morley also goes to one of the roots, former P.i.L. bassist Jah Wobble.  As you may know, while being the former, he is still present, putting out at least two albums in the last three years, collaborating with Chinese and Japanese musicians.  In this interview with Morley, Wobble talks about his bass beginnings, cheap heroin infested sqauts with Keith Levine, Sid Vicious, playing the bass against the headboard of a bed and checking out the resonance.  Can, Stockhausen, the German approach of needing to find out why things function, Miles Davis and tons more. Wobble Interview runs 50 minutes.

Also check out Dangerous Minds’ recent post on Jah Wobble, centered around his ‘Betrayal’ album.  Now I know why the album was called so.  I just started hanging around the radio station at York University in Toronto when I was introduced to this album back in 1980. Blueberry Hill was the track, ‘kin ell!

Kind of Bloop – 8-bit Versions of Miles

cover

What would Miles, Coltrane, Bird sound like coming through a Nintendo console?

The question has been answered by Andy Balo of Waxy.org.  He loves the Miles’ Kind of Blue album, so he rolled up his sleeves and got to work.  With the assistance of  chiptune producers such as Virt, Shnabubula, and Disasterpeace, available now is the Kind of Bloop album.  Plans are afoot to issue a CD version of the album..  More more juice, check out Miles Davis

Thanks to Dangerous Minds for the pointer.