Rock Solid – Música en la Bienal

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Música en la Bienal at Los Jameos del Agua.

Impresionate total! / Incredible shit went down, off the hook by miles.  Never ever played in a place like this / Nunca en mi vida que he pinchando en un sitio como esa.Infuckincredible. Una initiativa muy supermegachachi. Gracias a todos. Being part of such a line-up and an environment that is Los Jameos was one of those moments that stick for a long time. 

Blistering performances from all crew.  Za! always take their surroundings into account when opening their show, this was no different, they have you wondering where the sound is coming from.  This time, the trumpet came from upon high, descending the stairs to setting in front of the reflective pool and illuminated volcanic area. Listening to Lara López’ program on RNE3, I discovered that Laraaji and Brian Eno played in this very same place many years ago. Damn, that was great, gotta say. No puedo respira!

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Meneo lost his travel documents, but there was no way he was going to miss his date in Lanzarote.  He arrived late, but only having to plug in his sound source, a Ninetendo or Gameboy, and that was it, no massive headache when it comes to setting up and getting right into it.

Tenerife’s Resonance brought the live element to a close his his rack of synth driven uptempo electronica.

Video below with Gonzo at the Controls: Projections and Lights: Deaxis Mundi & Simone Marin  Sound: Daniel Badal

http://www.bienalartelanzarote.com/

Related post here

Sarah Maple: You Could Have Done This

 

I wish I had a penis
I wish I had a penis

Since we last spoke…ah, won’t bother getting into it, check this out, Sarah Maple, you may have heard of her before, good on you, I am just catching up.  If you heard of her before, why didn’t you tell me?

Her father is white British, her mother is an Iranian Muslim, and she went to a Catholic school in Eastbourne. “I always found it difficult culturally knowing where I fit in,” says the 30-year-old artist, who lives in Crawley. “I wanted to be a ‘good’ Muslim, but I was an immediate outcast for being mixed. And I felt guilty about that.”

She has found her way, and aren’t we glad?  Well, no, not everybody is, to the point of throwing bricks through her window.

The opposite of a feminist
The opposite of a feminist

“I was at university and we’d go round doing crits, talking about each others’ work. Every time a man got up to speak, we’d be really supportive. But every time a woman spoke, we’d berate her. I realised I was complicit – subconsciously, we’d all taken on that conditioning. It was the first time I realised I might be held back by being a woman. The phrase ‘I wish I had a penis’ just came into my head. So I did that work based on it. When I took it into uni, although all the tutors liked it, everyone else berated me. Then I put it on MySpace and got all these amazing responses. People started sending me their own. That’s the moment I realised that, through humour, I could really communicate something.”

She has a book coming out, titled You Could Have Done This, which for me is the point of art, especially when people say “Oh, I coulda done that!”  But you didn’t, that person did, regardless if you like it or not.  Be inspired to move, even with something that rubs you the wrong way.  More power to you.

More on Sarah Maple here via the Guardian.Her webpage is here

 

Socos Dúo: Album – These Times We Are Living

Next week Saturday, 15th March, we will be on hand for the presentation of the first album for Socos Dúo and the first for us as a label.  We will pop a bottle of red for sure, it’s been waiting to be opened for a while.  I walked into Arena Digital studios where I quite often work, and the sound coming out of the speakers in the control room grabbed me hard.  They were recording what is now encapsulated within a 5¨disc with the title, These Times We Are Living.

The duo, formed six years ago by broad-minded souls, César Martín and Ciro Hernandez, most uniquely combine marimba and cello, to perform selections from their new album, including works by Astor Piazzolla,  Osvaldo Golijov from Argentinia, Assobio Jato, Heitor Villa-Lobos, ‘Violence’ by Philadelphia, USA-based, 2014 Grammy nominated Joseph Hallman as well as their own  compositions, Lights and Shadows, written by Ciro, and Two Butterflies by César respectively.

This album embodies a devoted commitment to classics and to the contemporary.  Academedic foundational studies intertwined with realism, exposing human frailties and achievements and creative fortitude.

Added to the musical element is the visual and fine art of Patricia Delgado. She joins force to create an unique engraved album cover. Stains on the move, black and white, no color, representing a state of stillness and calm.

More juice via their website, or here, as we have it.

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Ruud van Empel

Spotted at The Guardian this morning…Ruud van Empel, from the Netherlands.

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Dawn#1, Ruud van Empel 2008
World#31, Ruud van Empel 2008

Many of the children in your works are black. How did this choice come about?

I grew up in a small Catholic town in the south of the Netherlands. There was only one black boy in my primary school class. In the portrait Generation 1 I expressed this situation. It shows a white class with just one black pupil. With World#1 I decided to work with more black children. It set off a whole new series of work. First I thought of portraying a girl in a dirty, old and torn-up dress, as if she were very poor. I suppose this idea popped up in my head because of the image we westerners are often given. I didn’t really like that idea though, and decided to give them the clothes my generation wore when we were kids, especially because those clothes looked very innocent to me. Later, in 2007, the art historian Jan Baptist Bedaux told me this was the first time a black kid was portrayed as a symbol for innocence in western art. He wrote:

The fact that many of the children in his compositions have a dark skin is a facet that cannot remain without comment. Although it is self-evident that a child’s skin colour is not important, the iconography of the innocent child was traditionally represented by ‘white’ children. The earliest examples of this date from the early 17th century. These are portraits in which children are captured in an idealised, pastoral setting. It is a genre to which the children’s portraits of the German artist Otto Dix, a source of inspiration to Van Empel, refer. In deviating from the standard iconography by giving the child a dark skin, Van Empel inadvertently assumes a political stance. After all, this child is still the focus of discrimination and its innocence is not recognised by everyone as being self-evident.

Full interview here

Ruud van Empel website